Woodworking And The Wood Lathe




Make A Clock With Hidden Storage

 

When moving from flat style woodworking like cabinet work and jewelry boxes to round work like bowls and pens, it appears that all that is needed will be a wood lathe and a few cutting tools. While there are many wood turning tools that could be gotten over the years, there are many other tools that are needed in order to explore the world of wood turning. Thankfully, many of these tools are already owned by the typical woodworker as are the skills to use them.
Wood needs to be prepared for the wood lathe. This begins for many projects with a log. One of the things that the typical woodworker needs to do when changing to work with the wood lathe is alter the way he or she thinks of getting wood. Instead of beginning with a nice, flat board from the local lumber dealer, a wood turner often starts with a felled log from the local tree surgeon or firewood supplier. The principle tool for beginning this procedure is a chain saw. Many woodworkers will have one of these for rough work and if not, an electric one will suffice for most needs.
Following the roughing of wood with the chain saw, there is the need to get it into reasonable shape for the lathe. This often means cutting it round or into long squares. One of the best tools for this is the band saw, owned by many woodworkers. It is also regarded as one of the safest saws in the shop and some would consider it one of the safest tools generally. It excels at long, circular cuts and with a bit of practice will do an admirable job at straight cuts as well. The fourteen inch band saw which will generally cut to a depth of six inches through hardwood, is a common feature in many woodworking shops. It is seldom that a wood turner will need a greater depth of cut but risers can be obtained for most fourteen inch saws on the market and they can be retrofitted to cut to depth of up to twelve inches.
Lathe tools need to be frequently sharpened. Some of the wood that turners like to work with will have lots of knots, included bark or grit from the felling of the tree. These conditions combined with the high speeds of the moving wood tend to quickly dull a tool. Most woodworking shops have a grinder used to remove nicks from plane blades and chisels and to reshape an edge before using whet stones to fine tune the cutting edge. Replacing one of the wheels with a fine grit aluminum oxide wheel and adding a sharpening jig quickly and simply turns the the grinder into a lathe tool sharpener and also allows its original use at the other wheel. The sharpening jig is not necessary but very nice and can be easily made in the home woodworking shop.
So the need for wood lathe tools for the home woodworker quickly becomes reduced to the lathe itself and the various cutting tools that may be needed. Many if not all of the other tools will be found already in the home woodworking shop. Of course, this is all followed by the enjoyment of learning new woodworking skills at the wood lathe and the continued pleasure of making new works in wood.

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What Is a Wood Lathe?


A wood lathe is a type of machinery, generally used in turning industrial products for ornamental purposes. In a nutshell, a lathe uses a rotation device that spins parallel to the surface, and with the help of different tools, it can create unique cuts and designs with a solid block of material. Lathe tools reformat an object by cutting, drilling, knurling and sanding, providing symmetrically designed products turned on a lathe.
From all types of lathe machinery, including the lathes used for pottery or jewelry, the wood lathe is the oldest. And without doubt, the different tools used for wood turning are the most part of the entire lathe machinery. This variety of tools used with wood lathes consists of different chisels, used for creating the unique designs and patterns resulted from wood turning. And the amazing thing about a wood lathe is not the unique designs or patterns, but the fact that it can produce a completely finished work entirely on its own. While most tools employed in industrial production require tools that are separate from the machine to finish the design, a lathe has its chisel tools attached directly to the lathe, allowing it to do all the work at once.
To better understand the concept, these wood turning tools of a wood lathe take a solid wood object and turn it into a symmetrical ornament, such as a table or chair leg. With the help of a wood setup, a woodworker will be able to duplicate identical wood parts, so all table or chair legs are the same.
Wood turning has a lot of different shapes, styles and designs to offer, possible through a wide range of accessories for wood lathes. And with nowadays' amazing advances in technology and machinery, the accessories are more proficient than ever. The most commonly used tools in wood turning are the gouge, the spear chisel, the skew chisel, the parting chisel and the round-nose chisel.
In order to get the best results and products, a woodworker has to know all the different tools used in a wood lathe, and understand their unique characteristics, features and capabilities. Understanding how each tool works is essential for the proper usage of a wood chisel, and the best results come with a lot of practice. For more detailed information, search online for the different types of wood lathe tools, and read about each tool in particular. And remember, practice makes perfect


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Wood Lathe Tools


High quality wood lathe tools equate to higher quality projects if the operator is efficient and well trained. Wood turning is an art and craft that many use to soothe their nerves or to create beautiful wooden objects. An integral part of the lathe is the wood lathe tool rest that can be re positioned as the project becomes smaller.
Wood turning tools can be purchased easily, but the quality of the cutting tool will make a huge difference in the outcome of any lathe project. A lathe cutting tool that is made of high quality steel will create wonderful results. But if the lathe operator does not know how to properly sharpen them, they will not cut properly; costing the operator much more time to bring the wood to final shape.
Lathe tools come in various sizes and many shapes and gives the operator the perfect angle to turn wood while working in many different angles. There are so many different shapes to the cutting tool that it can be overly confusing to a novice. It is advisable to learn the lathe and tool sharpening techniques by a trained professional. they can teach you so many different methods and tricks by using their own experiences.
Wood turning professionals and instructors can teach you how to sharpen wood turning tools, which is an element that some novice turners never consider important. But if you have ever tried cutting a piece of wood with a butter knife, you will understand how critical the art of sharpening wood lathe tools can be.

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Using Your Mini Wood Lathe the Right Way


Lathes are available in a wide range of sizes. You can invest in an industrial quality wood lathe that ways over eight hundred pounds. You can also purchase a mini wood lathe for smaller household do-it-yourself projects.
It is important to remember that different lathes really are intended for different purposes and projects. If you want to get the most out of mini wood lathe, you'll want to spend some time thinking about the right way to use it. Here are a few recommendations.
Don't Bite Off More Than You Can Chew
Mini lathes are built for small jobs. Period. The last thing you want to do is to try to press one of these lightweight solutions into service for an oversized job.
Initially, you'll often find it impossible. The small lathes simply won't accept large pieces of wood. You may be able to stretch its limits, intentionally or otherwise. That's why you should read your lathe's manual carefully to determine the maximum size you can safely use.
When you overload your mini wood lathe, it decreases the tool's effectiveness. It can also put too much pressure on the lathe. These tools exist to handle smaller jobs. They aren't sturdy or robust enough to hold up to the abuse of larger jobs. They simply lack the strength. If you try to do too much, you're likely to subject your tool to excess wear, resulting in rapid project failure.
Take Your Mini Lathe Seriously
Yes, your mini lathe is a lot smaller than a full-sized model. It may even strike you as having an almost toy-like appearance. However, it's not a toy. It is a serious piece of machinery with electric-powered moving parts. You can't afford to take that lightly.
You may be accustomed to working with more intimidating equipment, but you can't let that serve as an excuse to ignore safety recommendations. You should follow all of the safety and operation guidelines for your tool and you should treat every mini lathe project as seriously as you'd treat a larger job.
Take Your Time
Moving at a measured, deliberate pace will help with respect to safety, but it will also have a very real impact on the final outcome of your project. You don't really want to speed through any job, but a mini wood lathe justifies some extra patience.
These small wood turning lathes aren't as powerful as their bigger counterparts are. They don't rotate as quickly and they don't have the same muscle. As such, it's important to take your time and to approach your work methodically in order to secure the best possible results.
A mini loathe may become one of your favorite woodworking tools. They offer a great deal of flexibility and can be very helpful for a variety of projects. If you want to get the most out of your mini late, choose appropriately-sized projects, follow all safety recommendations and take your time. That's the route to great results!


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Wood Lathe Safety: Keep Your Lathe In Good Condition


Power tools such as table saws and wood lathes are inherently dangerous although the wood lathe is likely one the safest of the larger power tools in the woodworking shop. Yet there are some considerations in the maintenance of a wood lathe that keep safety standards high.
Maintenance for the wood lathe may be channeled into three categories, long term, regular and steady. For the amateur wood turner this can for all intents and purposes be thought of as yearly, monthly, and by the session. With a little thought and preparation, this need not be a tedious set of procedures but simply a part of the wood turning experience. Too often we ignore the bigger parts of a lathe until they break. This causes frustration an interruption in work flow that may last for weeks waiting for parts.
Yearly maintenance looks at the overall health of the lathe. Wood lathes rotate wood between head stocks and tail stocks while allowing the turner to move tools back and forth to remove wood. This means there are bearings for things that rotate, motors that drive the rotations, belts to move power from one location to another, and metal sliding on metal to allow tools to move.
The simplest of these to check is the sliding of tools rests and tailstocks over the ways of a lathe to manoeuvre tools and hold wood. If there is hesitation in the movement of either it is usually due to rust on the ways or finishes that have hardened on the metal. Remove the tailstock and the tool rest banjo from the lathe and check for either on the bottom of each. Clean rust and finish from the ways, banjo and tailstock with fine sandpaper, steel wool or cleaner and apply wax to the ways for easier movement and rust prevention before replacing the tailstock and banjo.
Check belts for wear and replace them from spare belts that you have on hand. Belts tend to be the inexpensive side of lathe repair and it is good to have a spare one in the shop. Likewise, bearing will likely announce incipient wear with noise or movement and should be ordered before demanding replacement. Each lathe is slightly different for bearing replacement so follow your manufacturers advice.
At least monthly blow any dust out of the motor and inspect the wiring for good repair. Mounting bolts can loosen with vibration from turning wood and should be checked for tightness. This is a good time to look at belts and bearings for wear and to order new ones for the annual checkup.
Before every turning session make sure that the lathe is not crowded with other tools and there is plenty of room to move around it while turning. Be sure all tools are sharp and the sharpening station is ready to go with a cleaned wheel. Just before turning the lathe on check one more time to be certain the moving wood will clear the tool rest and all parts of the lathe are tightened down.
Very quickly this all becomes second nature and adds to the enjoyment of turning wood. The satisfaction of knowing the tools are in order will only add to the satisfaction and pleasure of the wood turning experience.
Darrell Felt mate is a juries wood turner whose web site, Around the Woods, contains detailed information about wood turning for the novice or experienced turner as well as a collection of turnings for your viewing pleasure. You too can learn to turn wood, here is the place to start. Wondering what it looks like? There are many free videos on the site dealing with everything from sharpening to making a bowl.



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Making a Pen with Your New Wood Lathe


So you just purchased a wood lathe but do not know what kind of project you should start out with. As soon as the right amount of skill is obtained, beautiful pieces of woodwork can be created with a wood lathe. However, before you get too over your head, it is best to start out with a basic woodturning project. My recommendation would be beginning by carving your very own pen.
Pen turning is a common hobby or past time. These homemade pens can make excellent gifts for any event. Pen turning is a fun yet practical project that can help you get a taste of the capabilities of your wood lathe. The following are some tips in preparing your wood for the lathe that will help you make your first wood lathe experience successful.
1. Pick an interesting wood blank. One of the great things 
about pen turning is you can use any sort of wood you want, including scrap pieces from other projects. Pick out a piece of wood with interesting figuring. Be aware that some wood changes appearance with light and air exposure and will begin to look dull with time, such as Paduak or Purple Heart wood. If you are not comfortable using a scrap piece of wood there are numerous wood blanks that can be purchased in all sorts of exotic woods.

2. Examine your wood. It is very important that you examine the wood you are using for your pen project. Make sure that your wood is dry and without faults or cracks. Damp and cracked wood will make for a lousy pen, if you can even make one out of that type of wood at all.
3. It is better to be oversized than undersized. If you have to choose between an oversized wood blank and an undersized blank, always choose the oversized one. This will give you some leeway just in case you make a mistake.
4. Have an idea. As with everything else in life, your pen will turn out better if you have an idea on what you want to create before you start. Decide before using the wood lathe on what type of shape you want your pen to be.
5. Mark the wood blank before you cut. It is nice to put a pencil mark across the grain of the wood before you start. This will make it easier to match up the grain pattern after you cut the wood blank.
6. Make sure your ends are square. If the ends of your wood blank are not perfectly square before using the wood lathe, there will be possibilities of cracking when the pen is assembled.
7. The smaller wood lathe the better. This tip is really just meant to make your life easier. Any wood lathe is suitable for pen turning; however, the smaller the wood lathe the easier your job is.
8. Keep it simple the first couple of times. It is tempting to want to do some fun and intricate pen shapes the first couple of times but stick to the basics until you figure out just exactly what it is you are doing.
A pen is an easy project that can help you with the beginning possibilities of your new wood lathe. After you conquer creating your own pen, there are several other projects to start with such as table and chair legs, wooden bowls, wooden hammers, candle sticks, or even pieces to a chess set. Just remember to begin with a simple project with your wood lathe to get use to your new tool before attempting more difficult projects.


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An Introduction to the Wood Lathe Chuck



A wood lathe chuck can be an excellent addition to any wood lathe. A chuck allows one to turn smaller pieces of wood with a high degree of flexibility while avoiding the inconvenience supporting the wood with the tail stock.
Many people use wood lathe chucks for smaller projects. They are an absolutely necessary tool for anyone who would like to turn wooden bowls or similar items.
You can choose your wood lathe chuck from two different options. Three-jaw chucks center the wood in the lathe automatically and are well suited for symmetrical projects. That is because these chucks basically immobilize the wood, which means all rounding will be toward the true center of the wood. These are the lathe chucks with which most woodworkers first experiment. They produce great results, even though they are somewhat limited in what they can do.
A four-jaw wood lathe chuck offers more flexibility. These chucks allow the lathe user to move the wood during the turning process. This allows the operator to create rounded pieces that are not necessarily symmetrical or centered. These chucks are ideal for those who are handling very specialized aspects of custom projects and for artists who do not want to find themselves limited any more than necessary.
Suppliers provide three-jaw and four-jaw chucks in multiple sizes. A jewelry maker may find himself using a tiny, one-inch chuck. Meanwhile, a turner of a large wooden bowl may work with a chuck with a full two-foot diameter! There is a chuck for every project and every preference.
Your choice of a chuck size must be governed by two factors: the size of the lathe upon which the chuck will be used and the size of the wood pieces you plan to turn. Before you purchase a wood lathe chuck, double check your lathe's capacity and determine the chuck's intended use. That will help you to secure the right tool for your specific needs.
Lathe chucks can produce some amazing effects. Any lathe-using woodworker will be able to find a number of uses for these tools.
At the same time, it is important to note that these devices are best managed by experienced lathe users. That is particularly true of the manually manipulate four-jaw chuck. Additionally, numerous accidents occur when chucks become stuck. Anyone using a wood lathe chuck should make safety a top priority and should know the proper procedure for handling a stuck chuck.
If you are serious about woodworking and love your lathe, you can make it even more valuable, flexible and enjoyable by adding a three-jaw or four-jaw chuck to the mix. These great tools make it possible to use your lathe to complete a number of gorgeous products.


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Turning a laminated wooden vase on the lathe

Homemade Wood Lathe ( a good start! )





The elusive homemade wood lathe can be built if you make yourself Do It! This video shows how I made the mandrel/arbor for mounting turning stock onto a motor. The mandrel/arbor needs to be made out of a piece of hard wood!!! I use poplar in the video for testing the build procedure. Soft wood does not work and is dangerous!!! In fact, doing, is dangerous! This video is not an invitation for practice, It is only for illustrative purposes.

I am doing this to see if turning is something that I would like to do. I also would rather waste time than money, learning doesn't have to be expensive.

The mandrel/arbor in this video is more precise and balanced than the general hardware store variety.

Wood Lathe Turning Christmas Tree Ornament

Using Your Mini Wood Lathe the Right Way




Lathes are available in a wide range of sizes. You can invest in an industrial quality wood lathe that ways over eight hundred pounds. You can also purchase a mini wood lathe for smaller household do-it-yourself projects.
It is important to remember that different lathes really are intended for different purposes and projects. If you want to get the most out of mini wood lathe, you'll want to spend some time thinking about the right way to use it. Here are a few recommendations.
Don't Bite Off More Than You Can Chew
Mini lathes are built for small jobs. Period. The last thing you want to do is to try to press one of these lightweight solutions into service for an oversize job.
Initially, you'll often find it impossible. The small lathes simply won't accept large pieces of wood. You may be able to stretch its limits, intentionally or otherwise. That's why you should read your lathe's manual carefully to determine the maximum size you can safely use.
When you overload your mini wood lathe, it decreases the tool's effectiveness. It can also put too much pressure on the lathe. These tools exist to handle smaller jobs. They aren't sturdy or robust enough to hold up to the abuse of larger jobs. They simply lack the strength. If you try to do too much, you're likely to subject your tool to excess wear, resulting in rapid project failure.
Take Your Mini Lathe Seriously
Yes, your mini lathe is a lot smaller than a full-sized model. It may even strike you as having an almost toy-like appearance. However, it's not a toy. It is a serious piece of machinery with electric-powered moving parts. You can't afford to take that lightly.
You may be accustomed to working with more intimidating equipment, but you can't let that serve as an excuse to ignore safety recommendations. You should follow all of the safety and operation guidelines for your tool and you should treat every mini lathe project as seriously as you'd treat a larger job.
Take Your Time
Moving at a measured, deliberate pace will help with respect to safety, but it will also have a very real impact on the final outcome of your project. You don't really want to speed through any job, but a mini wood lathe justifies some extra patience.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4352151

Cheap Wood Lathes



There are a lot of reasons why investing in an expensive, high quality wood lathe is a good idea.
There are a number of benefits to moving up in price and quality range. You will get a larger lathe, which allows much more freedom and variety in the projects you can do and the pieces you can make and large lathes are heavier which reduces vibration. You will get better finish and machining, parts will be better aligned and the overall product will be much nicer.
Lathes are one area where you can still buy a tool that will last for years, or even decades. They are fairly simple devices, and solidly built, in general from cast iron.
So why would anyone ever invest in a cheap lathe?
Well there are several reasons you might consider a cheaper model of wood lathe. Some of them are good, others not so much, but it's a valid idea in any case.
The number one situation I think someone should invest in an inexpensive lathe is if they are a beginner. If you don't have a lot of experience buying a large expensive wood lathe could end up being a costly mistake.
I know a lot of people who go into things all gunge ho only to lose interest shortly afterward. In my opinion if you don't have a lot of experience you should consider investing in a a small inexpensive wood lathe initially, and consider it a starter that you will upgrade in a few years.
Another good reason to buy a cheap lathe is as a complement to a larger tool. If you already have a large wood lathe it could be useful, to have a smaller one for detail work, or small projects such as pen turning or lure making. Not all small lathes are created equal however, and some of them can be just as expensive as larger models.
A third reason for a smaller cheaper lathe is simply to save space, some people don't have a lot of room in their shops, or even a dedicated shop at all, and it wouldn't make very much to put a full sized lathe in your living room.
There are some decent lathes out there in the 300-400 dollar range, and even a few passable ones around 150 dollars, but I personally wouldn't go lower than that, or you risk getting a complete dud.
You can find a good list of cheap wood lathes along with prices and specs at Wood Lathes Online.
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